[ Home | Eschatology | Bible Studies | Classics | Articles | Sermons | Apologetics | Search | F.A.Q. ]

Author Topic: College and Homeschooling  (Read 5514 times)

Dan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 191
  • Gender: Male
  • Dan the Man
College and Homeschooling
« on: November 10, 2003, 02:04:01 PM »

I understand this is a pro homeschooling forum, and I repect that. But I think that all the information should be made available for all those considering taking this plunge before they do.

For example, it is a fact that "some" Colleges do not accept homeschooled students. You should check the college admitance procedures of the school you want to send your children to "before" you hop into this.

Second, find out if your institution can admit home-schooled students as regular students without jeopardizing its eligibility to participate in the Title IV, HEA [Higher Education Act] student financial assistance programs.

Don't just jump in because someone says you'll be ok.




Christ_Alone

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 126
  • Gender: Female
  • Reformed & ever reforming... by His grace
    • Here We Stand
Re:College and Homeschooling
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2003, 06:12:32 AM »
For college bound homeschoolers, and/or parents concerned with this issue, following is some of the best resources and most accurate legal information out there:
Colleges and Universities

Issue Description
Information and recommendations regarding college admissions and financial aid requirements and preparing your homeschool student for college.


Issue Background
For several years, the Home School Legal Defense Association has been working on state and federal issues to improve admission procedures for homeschoolers at colleges and universities across the country. In 1996 HSLDA conducted a nationwide college survey sampling the homeschool admissions policies in all 50 states. This survey revealed that although many colleges eagerly accepted homeschoolers, just as many had not formulated any policies regarding homeschool admission, and were confused about the legal issues involved. This was compounded by the fact that homeschooled students could not get Federal financial aid without obtaining a GED or state-certified diploma. Therefore, the Association drafted federal legislation to place homeschool college applicants for admissions and financial aid on the same footing as traditional applicants.


This language was included in The Higher Education Act Amendments of 1998 (Pub. L. No. 105-244) and changed what post-secondary schools could require of homeschool applicants. These new guidelines, however, have only slowly reached local financial aid offices, and HSLDA has recently been heavily involved in educating these offices on the documentation homeschoolers can be required to give for financial aid.


Federal Requirements for Homeschoolers Seeking College Admission and Financial Aid 6/19/2003   Colleges and universities frequently ask two questions about homeschoolers: (1) Are homeschoolers eligible for financial aid without obtaining a GED or passing an ability-to-benefit test? and (2) Can a university admit a student with a homeschool high school diploma who is under the age of compulsory attendance and still retain its eligibility for federal funding? The answer to both questions is "Yes."
 
Home Schooled Students Excel in College 10/27/2003     This document contains information on home school graduates, their ACT and SAT scores, their academic and social performance in colleges, college admission officials' viewpoints, model home school college admission guidelines and applicable federal laws.
 
Rating Colleges & Universities by their Home School Admission Policies   This document ranks participating colleges and universities by the home school-friendliness of their admission policies.
 
The College Board: Home-Schooled Students and College Admission   Information on the SAT, PSAT/NMSQT, CLEP tests and college admission resources
 ACT Test
 
ACT Online Registration, Test Dates, Locations, and Codes


-----------------------------------------------------------------
Resources

Preparing For College 10/27/2003
  Sample Transcripts Now Available to HSLDA Members 7/7/2003
 
Homeschool Students Excluded from Scholarship Program 3/24/2003
 
Breakthrough for Homeschoolers Seeking College Admission and Financial Aid 2/12/2003
 
Homeschooling: Growing Force in Higher Education 1/16/2003
 
Action Alert: End College Discrimination Permanently 9/3/2002
 
Victory over College Discrimination 6/17/2002
 
Breakthrough for Young College-Bound Home School Graduates 4/30/2002
 
U.S. Department of Education Guidance Letter for Home School Student Eligibility 4/29/2002
 
Homeschoolers and College 1/31/2002
 
1999 College Survey: College Admissions Policies 12/4/2000
 
College-bound Home Schoolers Make Headlines 4/18/2000
  1998-99 ACT Average Composite Scores for Home Schooled Students by State 3/22/2000


To access any of the articles in bold above, or the resources listed, go here: http://www.hslda.org/docs/nche/Issues/C/College.asp

I would also like to point out something noted in the article called "1998-99 Survey of College Admissions Policies" (just for a little more clarification on what is factual and what isn't):


From Fall 1998 through the following spring, Home School Legal Defenseís National Center conducted an informal survey of U.S. college admissions policies. The surveys had several goals: (1) to establish what colleges and universities currently require of home schooled applicants, (2) to compare those requirements to the National Center for Home Educationís Recommended College Admission Policies, and (3) to encourage colleges and universities to loosen unnecessarily restrictive home school admission requirements and adopt the National Centerís Recommended College Admission Policies.


The National Center sent letters to 971 colleges, requesting information on their home school admission policies. A total of 513 institutions (52.8%) responded with complete information, and these usable responses were ranked in the following three groups:


Tier I. Admission policies similar to National Center for Home Educationís Recommended College Admission Policies:


A majority of the respondents (349 or 68%) had admission policies similar to the National Centerís recommended policies. These colleges typically required a parentís transcript, general standardized achievement testing, and/or the review of a portfolio of the potential studentís materials in place of an accredited diploma.


Tier II. GED required in place of, or in addition to, any of the Tier I requirements:


Nearly a third of the respondents (144 or 28.1%) required a GED for home school admission. Many of these colleges based this admission criterion of a GED on a federal requirement for financial aid in the Ability to Benefit. However, this federal requirement no longer applies since the passage of our home school amendment to the Higher Education Act of 1998.


Tier III. Standardized achievement test scores (i.e. SAT II) required from home school, but not traditional high school, graduates:


Three and one-half percent of the respondents (18) asked home schoolers to take extra standardized exams. Also contained in Tier III were colleges requiring home schooled students to score higher than traditionally schooled students on standardized achievement tests or entrance exams. Only two respondents (.03%) did not accept home school graduates.


About a third of the responding schools (166 or 32.4%) were state-funded institutions. State funded colleges were more likely to have stringent home school admission policies: 66.6% of the Tier III schools were state funded. In Tier I, however, only 29.3% of the colleges were state funded. Tier II schools had a slightly higher percentage (36.1%) of state funded schools than Tier I. The two schools not admitting home schoolers were both private colleges.

In addition, in the article "Rating Colleges" - the actual colleges who took part in the survey, are listed - along with their actual admission policies for homeschooled students, as well as the 2 private colleges that do not accept homeschoolers.

Granted, this study is now 4 years old, and only half of the colleges contact replied, but this does show us a more realistic picture of college level policies on homeschooled students.

I hope this helps.
in His love...... Carla


In His love... CA

Dan

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 191
  • Gender: Male
  • Dan the Man
Re:College and Homeschooling
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2003, 03:14:29 AM »
Nevertheless, not all colleges will accept homeschoolers. But if people don't mind, and will just find one that will, then fine. Just as long as they know that going in.

Christ_Alone

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 126
  • Gender: Female
  • Reformed & ever reforming... by His grace
    • Here We Stand
Re:College and Homeschooling
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2003, 06:17:36 AM »
Hi Dan,

I agree that parents should do as much research as possible, before making the decision to homeschool.  

Most of the homeschooling parents I know, do indeed consider all the options, before making this choice, and thankfully, there are many accurate sources out there, that provide us with the most up to date, legal and jurisdictional information.

I guess that's part of why I do what I do.  I like to be informed with the facts, and I like to pass on what I've found, to help other homeschooling families, or those considering the option.  There's alot of myth, and misinformation out there, so to find a factual source, and pass it on, I hope contributes to well founded decisions.  ;D
In His love... CA

Kenneth White

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 311
  • Gender: Male
  • Thinking Christians, Intelligent Theology
Re:College and Homeschooling
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2003, 06:54:07 AM »
Nevertheless, not all colleges will accept homeschoolers. But if people don't mind, and will just find one that will, then fine. Just as long as they know that going in.


Hey Dan, scroll down and check this list. There can't be too many, now are there  ;D

http://learninfreedom.org/colleges_4_hmsc.html

Proverbs 1:5-6 "A wise man will hear, and will increase learning; and a man of understanding shall attain unto wise counsels: To understand a proverb, and the interpretation; the words of the wise, and their dark sayings."

Reformer

  • Affiliate Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1660
  • Reformed and Evangelical
Re:College and Homeschooling
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2003, 05:30:40 AM »

Hey Dan, scroll down and check this list. There can't be too many, now are there  ;D

http://learninfreedom.org/colleges_4_hmsc.html



Good info Kenneth, Thanks!

judykanova

  • Gold Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 918
  • Gender: Female
Re:College and Homeschooling
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2003, 05:40:25 AM »
Wow Kenneth, that's some impressive list... including the top-ranked Ivy League schools.

Thanks for dispelling any remaining misconceptions that homeschoolers aren't accepted into top-notch colleges.

judy
'For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven.'   Ps 119:89

Christ_Alone

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 126
  • Gender: Female
  • Reformed & ever reforming... by His grace
    • Here We Stand
Re:College and Homeschooling
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2003, 11:17:01 AM »
Yes, excellent material there, indeed an impressive list, compared to the myth perpetuated that there are "so many" colleges that refuse homeschooled students.

It really does pay to research these things yourself, rather than just go with what you've heard.
In His love... CA

Garet86

  • Guest
Re:College and Homeschooling
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2004, 06:15:45 PM »
Yes, excellent material there, indeed an impressive list, compared to the myth perpetuated that there are "so many" colleges that refuse homeschooled students.

It really does pay to research these things yourself, rather than just go with what you've heard.

I am 18 years old and still homeschooled, for about 10 years going on 11. But Since this is my last year (I hope), I am going to Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) before college for classes, for one my homeschooling program (American School) does not have a language course, so I have to go to a community college for that, but just for classes.

I am also planning on going to a capernwray school in Germany called Bodenseehof, a good school I could go for 6 months and then go to college. So I suppose homeschooler's have to do a lot of back and forth with school once they get to college. So I suppose you could offer that to your kids when they are ready for all that.

But be warned, my brother is 21 years old, he was homed schooled for as long as I, and he graduated when he was 20 because of his laziness. It is very easy to just sit back and do nothing, so you gotta teach them discipline, for the most part I had to teach my self that.

 


[ Home | Eschatology | Bible Studies | Classics | Articles | Sermons | Apologetics | Search | F.A.Q. ]