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Author Topic: N.T. Wright's Theology  (Read 150 times)

da525382

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N.T. Wright's Theology
« on: February 01, 2020, 11:30:51 AM »
N.T. Wright seems to have a significant following.  However, his take on scripture, especially Romans and justification itself, is distinguished from the interpretations of Reformed theology.  With his interpretation of scripture being more covenant based (although Reformed theology is covenant based as well), I am concluding that he has simply chosen to find a nuanced covenant approach to exegesis.  But he has implicated Reformed theology as completely misunderstanding justification itself, among other things.

However, what has happened it seems to me, is that he has now created a new, fourth general body of Christianity, i.e., the first three being Orthodoxy, Catholicism, and Protestantism.  My take is that he believes that Reformed scholars of the Middle Ages were completely ignorant of Jewish thinking in the first century, that somehow he himself believes he is enlightened with respect to that thinking, and that therefore he has the key to proper exegesis of scripture because he can see them through the mindset of the first century Jew (or "ancient Hebrew thinking").  At the same time, he sees, I believe, Reformed theology merely in the context of a dispute of the Western mind over scripture, i.e., Catholicism vs Reformed theology, neither of which deal with how the first century Jew or ancient Hebrew thought would have interpreted the coming of Christ and the subsequent writings of the New Testament.

An insinuation to his theology is that he really seems to implicate the Reformers for anti-semitism in the world after the Reformation, resulting of course in WW II and Hitler using Luther's own words to condemn Judaism itself.

Does anyone have any thought on Wright's theology with respect to a defense of the Reformers and their perspective on Judaic thinking in the context of interpreting the coming of Christ and especially with respect to the interpretation of the Pauline epistles, as well as his seeming indictment of Reformed theology as anti-semitic?

Trevor

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Re: N.T. Wright's Theology
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2020, 06:02:56 PM »
However, what has happened it seems to me, is that he has now created a new, fourth general body of Christianity, i.e., the first three being Orthodoxy, Catholicism, and Protestantism.  My take is that he believes that Reformed scholars of the Middle Ages were completely ignorant of Jewish thinking in the first century, that somehow he himself believes he is enlightened with respect to that thinking, and that therefore he has the key to proper exegesis of scripture because he can see them through the mindset of the first century Jew (or "ancient Hebrew thinking").

Does he believe that the mindset of the first century Jew is relevant to the proper interpretation of scripture? For instance, is the mindset of the Scribes and Pharisees relevant to the interpretation of Old Testament scripture prophesying of Christ's coming? I would think not. They could think anything that they wanted, but it has nothing to do with the reality of what God intended when he inspired it written. Which is why they completely missed the Messiah in the first place.


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  At the same time, he sees, I believe, Reformed theology merely in the context of a dispute of the Western mind over scripture, i.e., Catholicism vs Reformed theology, neither of which deal with how the first century Jew or ancient Hebrew thought would have interpreted the coming of Christ and the subsequent writings of the New Testament.

Doesn't he believe that God himself is literally the author of scripture and so interpretations belong to him? Does he believe Christians are "required" to understand the mindset of the first century Jew before they can properly interpret the scriptures inspired written by God? I don't believe that to be true, nor to be of sound thinking.


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An insinuation to his theology is that he really seems to implicate the Reformers for anti-semitism in the world after the Reformation, resulting of course in WW II and Hitler using Luther's own words to condemn Judaism itself.

I don't think that we can lay the growth of antisemitism at the feet of men like Luther, the anti-semite is born of the wickedness of his own heart. While Luther's antisemitism is debatable, the truth of Reformed theology and the fall of the Jewish people from their God is not. At least not with scripture. This is not antisemitism to speak of Israel's fall, it is biblical truth.

The false indictment of Reformed theology as a type of antisemitism is seen even in this very forum, and it has nothing to do with Luther, it has to do with the inability of some Christians to accept God's word of Israel's rejection of Christ and God's determinate judgment upon them as not his children to be incorrect. But they are not his children, at least so long as that rejection lasts. These ideas that are contrary to truth are not from the scriptures but from a misguided sense of sympathy and fellowship. The same source of those who say God can't choose whoever he wants to save but must choose based on their free will.
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Dr. C. Trevor Bavinck
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Re: N.T. Wright's Theology
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2020, 08:01:14 PM »
The false indictment of Reformed theology as a type of antisemitism is seen even in this very forum, and it has nothing to do with Luther

Or anyone else. It's just a convenient excuse in place of a sound rebuttal to good exegesis.

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it has to do with the inability of some Christians to accept God's word of Israel's rejection of Christ and God's determinate judgment upon them

 )iagree(

Either the Bible will Keep you from Sin, or sin will keep you from the Bible

 


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