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Author Topic: 1 john 5:16 If any man see his brother sin a sin which is not unto death,  (Read 1755 times)

Bornagain

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1 john5:16   If any man see his brother sin a sin which is not unto death, he shall ask, and he shall give him life for them that sin not unto death. There is a sin unto death: I do not say that he shall pray for it. 
5:17   All unrighteousness is sin: and there is a sin not unto death. Can any one explain what it means in 1 john5:16  If any man see his brother sin a sin which is not unto death,THANKS Bornagain

Deepika

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Re: 1 john 5:16 If any man see his brother sin a sin which is not unto death,
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2010, 04:46:01 PM »
The answer to this is found in Matt 12:31,32

Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy [against] the [Holy] Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men.

And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the [world] to come.

Bornagain

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Re: 1 john 5:16 If any man see his brother sin a sin which is not unto death,
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2010, 04:26:23 PM »
Thank you very much Deepika,  i forgot about those Vere's, now it makes a whole lot of sense :)

norton

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I see the sin "unto death" here (in context), being performed by a brother i.e. "his brother".
That would mean to me that this brother is in Christ.

I can think of two places in the NT which describe a situation where a brother (or supposedly a brother) sins and then shortly dies.
#1. The account of Anias and Sapphira in Acts.
and the 2nd account I am thinking of may not be so clear: It is that person addressed in 1 Corinthians who "had his mother".
The writer tells the church to put out that person, and mentions "the destruction of the (guilty person) flesh". Though we don't read of a later mention of this persons' end.

Now if "destruction of the flesh" means death, then these two accounts -in my eyes- presents one of those rather startling incidents in the early church in which God wasn't messing around.

Usually I feel that the answer to our questions in a text, should be able to be found within the same book/letter (context).
I realize that my reply to this question does not meet this rule, but if there is an answer in 1 John, then I would be happy to find it.

 


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